We Offer Paper Writing Services on all Disciplines

Make an Order Now and we will be Glad to Help

Order Now



Ask a nursing expert to help you with your homework

We are ready to assist you anytime.

Order Now

Neuroimaging in mood disorders

Neuroimaging in mood disorders

It is not currently possible to diagnose depression or bipolar disorder with any neuroimaging technique. However, some progress is being made in mapping inefficient information processing in various circuits in mood disorders. In depression, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, associated with cognitive symptoms, may have reduced activity, and the amygdala, associated with various emotional symptoms including depressed mood, may have increased activity ( ).Figure 6-49 Furthermore, provocative testing of patients with mood disorders may provide some insight into malfunctioning of brain circuits exposed to environmental input, and thus required to process that information. For example, some studies of

Figure 6-49. . Neuroimaging studies of brain activationNeuroimaging of brain activation in depression suggest that resting activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of depressed patients is low compared to that in nondepressed individuals (left, top and bottom), whereas resting activity in the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) of depressed patients is high compared to that in nondepressed individuals (right, top and bottom).

Save your time - order a paper!

Get your paper written from scratch within the tight deadline. Our service is a reliable solution to all your troubles. Place an order on any task and we will take care of it. You won’t have to worry about the quality and deadlines

Order Paper Now

Downloaded from http://stahlonline.cambridge.org by IP 100.122.180.231 on Fri Mar 22 00:44:35 UTC 2019 Stahl Online © 2019 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution.

 

 

Figure 6-50. . EmotionalDepressed patient’s neuronal response to induced sadness versus happiness symptoms such as sadness or happiness are regulated by the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and the amygdala, two regions in which activity is high in the resting state of depressed patients (left). Interestingly, provocative tests in which these emotions are induced show that neuronal activity in the amygdala is over-reactive to induced sadness (bottom right) but under-reactive to induced happiness (top right).

depressed patients show that their neuronal circuits at the level of the amygdala are over-reactive to induced sadness but under-reactive to induced happiness ( ). On the other hand, imagingFigure 6-50 of the orbitofrontal cortex of manic patients shows that they fail to appropriately activate this brain region in a test that requires them to suppress a response, suggesting problems with impulsivity associated with mania and with this specific brain region ( ). In general, theseFigure 6-51 neuroimaging findings support the mapping of symptoms to brain regions discussed earlier in this chapter, but much further work is currently in progress and must be completed before the results of neuroimaging can be applied to diagnostic or therapeutic decision making in clinical practice.

Downloaded from http://stahlonline.cambridge.org by IP 100.122.180.231 on Fri Mar 22 00:44:35 UTC 2019 Stahl Online © 2019 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution.

 

 

Figure 6-51. . Impulsive symptoms of mania, such as riskMania patient’s neuronal response to no-go task taking and pressured speech, are related to activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Neuroimaging data show that this brain region is hypoactive in mania (bottom right) versus healthy (bottom left) individuals during the no-go task, which is designed to test response inhibition.

Downloaded from http://stahlonline.cambridge.org by IP 100.122.180.231 on Fri Mar 22 00:44:35 UTC 2019 Stahl Online © 2019 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution.

It is not currently possible to diagnose depression or bipolar disorder with any neuroimaging technique. However, some progress is being made in mapping inefficient information processing in various circuits in mood disorders. In depression, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, associated with cognitive symptoms, may have reduced activity, and the amygdala, associated with various emotional symptoms including depressed mood, may have increased activity ( ).Figure 6-49 Furthermore, provocative testing of patients with mood disorders may provide some insight into malfunctioning of brain circuits exposed to environmental input, and thus required to process that information. For example, some studies of

Figure 6-49. . Neuroimaging studies of brain activationNeuroimaging of brain activation in depression suggest that resting activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of depressed patients is low compared to that in nondepressed individuals (left, top and bottom), whereas resting activity in the amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) of depressed patients is high compared to that in nondepressed individuals (right, top and bottom).

Downloaded from http://stahlonline.cambridge.org by IP 100.122.180.231 on Fri Mar 22 00:44:35 UTC 2019 Stahl Online © 2019 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution.

 

 

Figure 6-50. . EmotionalDepressed patient’s neuronal response to induced sadness versus happiness symptoms such as sadness or happiness are regulated by the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and the amygdala, two regions in which activity is high in the resting state of depressed patients (left). Interestingly, provocative tests in which these emotions are induced show that neuronal activity in the amygdala is over-reactive to induced sadness (bottom right) but under-reactive to induced happiness (top right).

depressed patients show that their neuronal circuits at the level of the amygdala are over-reactive to induced sadness but under-reactive to induced happiness ( ). On the other hand, imagingFigure 6-50 of the orbitofrontal cortex of manic patients shows that they fail to appropriately activate this brain region in a test that requires them to suppress a response, suggesting problems with impulsivity associated with mania and with this specific brain region ( ). In general, theseFigure 6-51 neuroimaging findings support the mapping of symptoms to brain regions discussed earlier in this chapter, but much further work is currently in progress and must be completed before the results of neuroimaging can be applied to diagnostic or therapeutic decision making in clinical practice.

Downloaded from http://stahlonline.cambridge.org by IP 100.122.180.231 on Fri Mar 22 00:44:35 UTC 2019 Stahl Online © 2019 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution.

 

 

Figure 6-51. . Impulsive symptoms of mania, such as riskMania patient’s neuronal response to no-go task taking and pressured speech, are related to activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Neuroimaging data show that this brain region is hypoactive in mania (bottom right) versus healthy (bottom left) individuals during the no-go task, which is designed to test response inhibition.

Downloaded from http://stahlonline.cambridge.org by IP 100.122.180.231 on Fri Mar 22 00:44:35 UTC 2019 Stahl Online © 2019 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved. Not for commercial use or unauthorized distribution.

"Our Prices Start at $11.99. As Our First Client, Use Coupon Code GET15 to claim 15% Discount This Month!!":

Get started

How it works

Place an order

Select the paper type, page limit, discipline, and format, and then set the deadline. Specify your paper instructions and attach the additional materials.

Track the progress

Check the finished parts of the paper and ask for amendments if necessary. Use the online chat for quick communication with the writer

Receive a paper

Release the payment when you are fully satisfied with the work. Leave feedback to share your experience with our writer.

Why our online essay writing service?

All types of paper writing help

Whether you need an essay, research paper, or dissertation, We have you covered. Our writers can create any kind of academic writing. Also, we can rewrite and edit your papers.

24/7 support

If you have questions about our service or need additional details to make a request, our friendly customer support will get your issues resolved.

On time delivery

Punctuality is our second name. Your order will be delivered strictly within the deadline. If you have an urgent order, we can do it! Our writers will need at least three hours to complete it.

Let us cover any of your writing needs!

Academic Paper Writing Service

Our best writers will gladly help you with:

Coursework / Homework

  • Homework Assignment
  • Engineering Assignment
  • Statistics Assignment
  • Biology Assignment
  • Nursing Assignment
  • Chemistry Assignment

Paperwork

  • Essay
  • Term Paper
  • Research Paper
  • Thesis / Dissertation
  • Research Proposal
  • Editing and proofreading

Others

  • Multiple Choice Questions
  • Short Answer Questions
  • Word Problems
  • Programming Assignment
  • Article Writing
  • Mathematics Calculations